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Digital Pianos

Digital pianos are types of electric pianos that serve as an alternative to acoustic and traditional pianos while staying compact and portable. A digital piano doesn’t have strings but samples to simulates the sounds of an acoustic piano. If you still aren’t sure if a digital piano is the exact type of piano for you, here is a shortlist to consider. The Casio PX-S1000 is our best selling digital piano, coming in three variations it is the perfect digital piano for a small home or for a beginner. The Casio GP510 Grand Hybrid is a paradigm shift is the electric piano design, utilising a full action grand piano action and full-length Austrian spruce keys, it is the closest you can get to a grand piano in a compact design.

Most piano learners also prefer digital pianos as opposed to traditional ones due to the many features it has that promote and assist learning. Features like built-in recorders, playback and even metronomes have been of great help to many learners. Digital pianos also allow for privacy as you can opt to use headphones and keep your practise sessions solely to yourself. Finally, digital pianos come in numerous sizes and designs. This allows for a wider selection to choose from.

For buyers and piano enthusiasts in Australia who wish to know more of the brands and models of digital pianos in their area, contact Carlingford Music Centre. Carlingford Music Centre is the exclusive distributor of famed brands which are top quality and world-class.

What is the best digital piano?

Beginner-Intermediate

Casio CDP-S150

Casio PX-S1000

Kawai ES110

Roland FP-30

Casio PX-870

Kawai KDP110

Intermediate-Advanced

Casio PX-560

Kawai CA59

Kawai MP11SE

Casio GP-510

Is it worth buying a digital piano?

Digital pianos, which are available in many sizesdesigns and price ranges, have their great strengths exactly where the weaknesses of the acoustic representatives lie: they are more compact, lighter, often much cheaper and – probably the biggest advantages in daily life – you don’t have to tune them and can simply turn their volume down or even practice on them with headphones. There are digital pianos that, like acoustic pianos, are stately “musical furniture” for the living room at home – even some digital grand pianos are available. If you don’t have much space or want to transport the instrument occasionally, you can choose a compact digital piano that is much lighter and space-saving. Here the transition to stage pianos is smooth, although the latter often have no built-in loudspeakers – they are connected to an amplification system, on stage anyway – and are therefore less suitable for practising at home.

Digital pianos have undergone a remarkable development in the quality of keyboards, sounds and speaker systems. Sophisticated keyboard mechanics, elaborately sampled sounds and powerful loudspeakers make sure that you really have to listen three times to hear middle and upper-class instruments in order to notice the difference to an acoustic instrument. But also inexpensive digital pianos like the Casio CDP-S150 Digital Piano, which is also available as a set with a piano bench and headphones, or the somewhat better equipped Kawai KDP110 Digital Piano don’t have to hide these days and offer a very good introduction to piano playing.

Is Digital Piano good for beginners?

Perhaps you’re thinking about getting a piano but you’re not sure whether you should be looking for digital pianos, acoustic pianos or getting an electronic keyboard, here are the main differences between the three…

Digital pianos are a mix between an acoustic piano and an electronic keyboard. Digital pianos allow for a greater variation in sounds because they allow for sound modification. They are larger than a keyboard and are usually the same length (88 keys) as an acoustic piano.

The sound quality of a digital piano is often better than a keyboard because they typically have built in speakers, but this also reduces the portability in comparison to the keyboard. Digital pianos also tend to have “weighted keys” which make them feel more like an acoustic piano when playing.

Is a digital piano the same as a keyboard?

Digital pianos are a mix between an acoustic piano and an electronic keyboardDigital pianos allow for a greater variation in sounds because they allow for sound modification. They are larger than a keyboard and are usually the same length (88 keys) as an acoustic piano.

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